Richmond Kiwanis Club

August, 2002 Newsletter

Meetings Tuesday - Noon - Banana's Restaurant

August Theme: "International Focus"

August 6
Dr. Neil Wright
Director, EKU International Office
"International Emphasis at EKU"

August 13
Dr. Ralph Thompson
Retired EKU Chemistry Professor
"Preparing for International Travel"

August 20
Allen Yang
President
EKU International Student Association
"Impressions of the U.S."

August 27
Cecile Schubert
Retired Teacher
Madison County Schools
"Impressions of Russia"

Tenth Annual Kiwanis Charity Golf Tournament

Held on July 12, 2002

Gibson Bay Golf Course

Winners of the Tenth Annual Kiwanis Charity Golf tournament is Bill and Kevin Weakley, Rick Hurt and Buddy Anderson.



The corporate sponsor was

Coldwell Banker - DeSloover Realty.


Hole Sponsors were:

Adams Pontiac Buick-GMC Truck, Baldwin Chiropractic PSC, Commonwealth Ford, Craft Noble Company PSC, Dentistry for Children, Dwight McMullin/Edward Jones, George N. Ridings, Jack Burfurd Chevrolet-Oldsmobile, Inc., Kentucky Utilities, Madison Bank, National City Bank, New York Life, Peoples Bank of Madison County, Turpin Funeral Home, and the YMCA.


Co-chairs of the event were

Brenda Blankenship and Dr. Robert Nayle

See photos of Tournament by clicking here



 
 

All their shots while they're tots!

Childhood Diseases You Can Prevent

Immunizations

Immunizing children protects them from diseases that can kill or permanently disable (physically or mentally). Every year,3.2 million children worldwide survive because they have been immunized. Another 2 million die because they were not immunized. Giving more than one vaccine at the same time will not increase reactions to the immunizations.

Diphtheria
 
 

Easily spread through coughing or sneezing

Early symptoms are a sore throat, slight fever, and chills.

Can interfere with swallowing and cause suffocation.

Can cause heart failure or paralysis if allowed to go untreated.

Can be prevented with the DTP (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis) vaccine.

Tetanus (Lockjaw)

Enters the body through a wound.

Produces a poison, which attacks the body 's nervous system.

Symptoms are headache, irritability, and stiffness in the jaw and neck.

Eventually causes muscle spasms in the jaw, neck, arms, legs, and abdomen.

May require intensive hospital care.

In the US, three of every 10 people who get tetanus die from it.

It is preventable through the use of DTP vaccine.

Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

Highly contagious.

Causes severe spells of coughing, which can interfere with eating, drinking, and breathing.

Complications may include pneumonia, convulsions, or encephalitis (inflammation of the brain).

In the US, about 65 percent of reported cases occur in children under age five.

In recent years, an average of 3,500 cases have been reported in the US.

It is preventable through the use of DTP vaccine.

Polio

Serious cases cause paralysis or death.

Mild cases cause fever, sore throat, nausea, headaches, and stomachaches. Pain and stiffness in the neck, back, and legs also occur.

Can be prevented by immunization with IP (inactivated polio vaccine).

Measles

Highly contagious.

Causes a rash, high fever, cough, runny nose, and watery eyes, lasting for one or two weeks.

Causes ear infections and pneumonia in one of every 20 children who get it.

Causes encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) in one of every 1,000 who get it. This can cause convulsions, deafness, or mental retardation.

Of every 1,000 children who get measles, one or two will die.

A person not immunized with MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine most likely will contract the disease during his or her life.

Mumps

Causes fever, headache, and inflammation of the salivary glands, resulting in swelling of cheeks or jaw.

One of every 10 who get mumps may develop meningitis (inflammation of the coverings of the brain and spinal cord). Sometimes causes encephalitis.

Can result in permanent hearing loss.

MMR vaccine prevents this disease.

Rubella (German Measles)

Most serious in pregnant women; with an infection early in pregnancy, there is an 80 percent chance it will cause birth defects in the unborn child.

Symptoms include mild discomfort, slight fever for 24 hours, and a rash on the face and neck, lasting for two or three days.

MMR vaccine prevents this disease.

Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib Disease)

Strikes one child of every 200 before age five and few after age five.

More serious in infants under one year of age.

Causes pneumonia and infections of the blood, joints, bones, soft tissues, throat, and the covering of the heart.

Causes meningitis in about 12,000 children per year; about one in four suffers permanent brain damage, and about one in 20 dies.

Hib vaccine prevents this disease.

Hepatitis B Virus

Infants born to HBV-infected mothers have up to an 85 percent chance of getting the infection.

HBV infection is spread within families and communities.

Infection at birth or during early childhood can result in long-term chronic illness.

Chronically infected persons can develop chronic liver disease and a rare form of cancer.

HBV vaccine prevents this disease.

Source:

Program Development Department
Kiwanis International
3636 Woodview Trace
Indianapolis,IN 46268
USA
(317)875-8755 (Worldwide)
(317)879-0204 (Fax)
(800)549-2647 (United States and Canada)
service@kiwanis.org
www.servingchildren.org


Special Events In August

Aug. 1-31: Family Fun Month - Celebrate being a family this month with quick-and-easy, fun-filled activities that bring everyone closer together.

Aug. 1-31: Back to School Month - Schedule community activities such as free shopping sprees that help impoverished children prepare for the upcoming school year. A key component of the Back-To-School program is building children's self-esteem by providing them with proper clothes and supplies as they start school. Operation Blessings, (757) 226-3440.

Aug. 1-31: Inventors' Month - To educate the American public about the value of creativity and inventiveness and the importance of inventions and inventors to the quality of our lives. Inventors' Digest, (617) 367-4540.

Aug. 1: World Wide Web Anniversary - The creation of what would become the World Wide Web was suggested this month in 1990 by Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics at Switzerland. By October, they had designed a prototype Web browser. They also introduced HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) and the URL (Universal Resource Locator). Mosaic, the first graphical Web browser, was designed by Marc Andreessen and released in 1993. By early 1993, there were 50 Web browsers worldwide.

Aug. 5: Canada Civic Holiday - The first Monday in August is observed as a holiday in Manitoba, New Brunswick, the Northwest Territories, Ontario, and Saskatchewan. It is British Columbia Day in British Columbia and Heritage Day in Alberta.

Aug. 6: National Night Out - Designed to heighten crime prevention awareness and to promote police-community partnerships. National Association of Town Watch, (800) 648-3688.

Aug. 10-14: Circle K International Convention - The annual gathering of Kiwanis Circle K leaders, Orlando, Florida.

Aug. 14: VJ Day - On Aug. 14, 1945, US President Harry S. Truman announced that Japan had surrendered to the Allies, setting off celebrations across the US. Official ratification of surrender occurred aboard the USS Missouri at Tokyo Bay on Sept. 2 (Far Eastern time).

Aug. 18-24: US National Friendship Week - A week for people to focus on friendship with their self on Sunday, spouses on Monday, children on Tuesday, family on Wednesday, friends on Thursday, workers on Friday, and neighbors on Saturday. Positive People Partners, 419-897-9914.

Aug. 19: US National Aviation Day - By presidential proclamation of July 25, 1939. Observed annually on anniversary of birth of Orville Wright, who piloted the first self-powered flight in history, Dec. 17, 1903.

Aug. 22: Be An Angel Day - A day to do "one small act of service for someone. Be a blessing in someone's life." Angel Heights Healing Center, 410-833-6912.


The Wellness on Wheels Wagon (WOW), one of the many projects supported by the Richmond Kiwanis, distributes health information to youth and schools in the Madison County Area. See here is Phyllis Adams, Richmond Kiwanis member, who is seen providing information at the Berea Spoonbread Festival. The wagon was also provided information to youth at the Kiwanis Carnival.

Keep up with Kiwanis News On Line

Click Here for the Kiwanis News Archive


Newsletter Editor - Glen Kleine - 623-3941


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